Foster Parent Training

Is there special training to become a Foster Parent?

Yes, the Our Kids’ PRIDE (Parent Resources for Information, Development, and Education) Pre-service training for foster and adoptive parents will assist you in deciding if becoming a Foster or Adoptive Parent is right for you and your family.

  • The importance of teamwork;
  • Co-Parenting techniques to work with the birth family;
  • Meeting developmental needs of the child in your care;
  • Helping children with loss and attachment and the effects of trauma;
  • Strengthening families; and
  • Continuing family relationships.
What training does a Foster Parent receive?

The Our Kids’ PRIDE (Parent Resources for Information, Development, and Education) model is based on specific competencies (knowledge and skills) needed to successfully perform the tasks of Foster and Adoptive care.

  • The importance of teamwork;
  • Co-Parenting techniques to work with the birth family;
  • Meeting developmental needs of the child in your care;
  • Helping children with loss and attachment and the effects of trauma;
  • Strengthening families; and
  • Continuing family relationships.

Foster Parents must complete a minimum of 21 hours of training.

What kind of continuing training and education is required once I become a Foster Parent?

Each year a Foster Parent must complete 8 hours of in-service training. Within the first year of licensure:

  • Training on Psychotropic Medications,
  • Water Safety Training, and
  • Trainings regarding understanding behaviors and the effects of trauma will be required as part of this in-service training program. These trainings are offered in the classroom and as on-line trainings.
What is a Home Study?

A Home Study is comprehensive assessment of the family and the physical environment of the home.

  • It is completed when a Licensing Counselor goes to the actual home of the perspective applicant and completes a thorough assessment of the physical environment that describes the home and reports on the health and safety of the home.
  • It also is a complete description and assessment of every adult who resides in the home which will include health and financial information, background screenings, references and commitment to PRIDE Competencies. Frequent visitors to the home will also be noted in the Home Study as well as their completed background screenings.
How long does a Home Study take?

The comprehensive Home Study begins at the initial home visit by the Our Kids Licensing Specialist. There are a minimum of two (2) home visits by the Licensing Specialist. The initial home visit is prior to training and a second visit occurs during the PRIDE Training Course. The Home Study is a process that begins at the time of your first home visit and is completed during your time in training.

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